Nasarawa State Strike On-going: Win-Win Negotiation Strategy Seems The Only Option…

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Murtala Adogi Mohammed

In a conventional win-win negotiated settlement, the agreement reached cannot be improved further by any discussions. So the outcome cannot be improved for the benefit of the conflicting parties, and similarly, the agreement for the other party cannot be improved further for their benefit either. By definition, there is no value left on the table and all creative options have been thoroughly explored and exploited.

The aim of win-win negotiation is to find a solution that is acceptable to both parties, and leaves both parties feeling that they’ve won, in some way, after the event. The current situation in Nasarawa State calls for win-win negotiation approach. We can’t continue this way, our people are relinquishing to poverty, hopelessness and bleakness for almost two weeks now, it seems there is no end in sight.

Every channel of negotiation has yielded no result. Emirs and chiefs, government negotiating team and state Assembly – all their efforts prove abortive. Gov Al-makura needs to understand that power is more effective when is opaque and enhance accountability when it is inclusive and happiness of the electorates is paramount. Nasarawa state runs a salary-based economy – 98% hangs on 2% state civil servants for their survival – something needs to done its not too late.

Yes, win-win negotiation is less about the process, less about the “how” of getting there, and more about the destination. Our destination is that the strike should come to an end. Both parties need to prepare in details and legitimate “gamesmanship” to gain advantage. Anyone who has been involved with large sales negotiations will be familiar with this.

Both government and labor need to ask themselves the following questions….

What do you want to get out of the negotiation? What do you think the other person wants? What is the history of the relationship? Could or should this

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